Kelly Services | Work–Life Design: the new balance

Work Life design: the new balance

Today’s workers are more empowered and want more flexibility than ever before. Employers can no longer just pay lip service to work–life balance. They have to understand that their workers are individuals and have priorities outside work. Kelly Services has conducted a study that provides deep insights into how to attract and retain top talent, and to propose Work–Life Design – a new, more balanced work environment.

What Work–Life Design means

This study is based on 2015 and 2014 data from the Kelly Global Workforce Index (KGWI) – the largest annual global survey of its kind – as well as insights from Kelly Services’ Free Agent 2015 survey. The study’s global results show that while flexibility is now a workplace imperative, workers also value a wide range of other benefits, along with a collaborative culture. These form the key elements of Work–Life Design.

What people want from their workplace

0%

63% want flexible work arrangements such as remote work options and flexible hours

0%

49% value paid time off such as vacation days and sick days

0%

43% desire wellness programs like an on-site fitness center, health club memberships and stress reduction initiatives

0%

82% believe their skills and knowledge will need to evolve to keep up with industry changes

0%

43% value fellow workers and managers with an entrepreneurial mindset

0%

57% value a highly collaborative environment

The highly competitive global market for skills demands a new approach to talent management. Work–Life Design takes a holistic approach that includes providing benefits that improve each worker’s career and lifestyle. It also fosters a collaborative, entrepreneurial culture that embraces innovation and change.

What professional / technical talent values

The Kelly study reveals that professionals in financial services, IT, science and engineering have higher expectations than the average global worker in a number of respects.

What Work-Life Design elements would you give up higher pay for?

Financial services

33%
27%

The opportunity to work remotely (33%) and a reduced schedule (27%)

IT

41%
41%
27%
22%

Flexible work arrangements (41%), the opportunity to work remotely (41%), a reduced schedule (27%) and sabbaticals (22%)

Science

40%
28%

Flexible work arrangements (40%) and additional vacation time (28%)

What Work–Life Design elements would you give up higher career advancement for?

IT

30%
28%

The opportunity to work remotely (30%) and a reduced schedule (28%)

Science

27%
21%

Flexible work arrangements (27%) and the opportunity to work remotely (21%)

Beyond salary, what Work–Life Design elements are most important to you in a package?

Engineering

49%
23%

Wellness program (49%) and caregiver support (23%)

Financial services

52%
25%

Wellness program (52%) and caregiver support (25%)

IT

69%
50%
25%

Flexible work arrangements (69%), a wellness program (50%), and caregiver support (25%)

Science

69%
65%

Vacation/paid time off (69%), and flexible work arrangements (65%)

Economics will be one of the key factors in shaping the way things play out. Vaughn Smith, VP of corporate development at Facebook, puts the value of a good engineer at $500,000 to $1 million. Dr. John Sullivan, an HR thought leader and professor of management at San Francisco State University, adds, ‘Nothing spurs executives to focus on talent management like quantifying in dollars the added economic value of having top-performing workers vs. average ones.’

Kelly Talent Supply Chain Management

Work–life Design is not a gender issue (KGWI 2015)

A significant cultural shift is taking place in the issue of work–family balance. Women have increased their participation rate in the workforce to more than half (53%) while men decreased theirs (from 73% in 1990 to 68% in 2013), according to OECD research. As a result, the care of children is a topic fathers can no longer take for granted. KGWI 2015 data shows men value flexible work arrangements almost as much as women.

What women and men value in their workplaces ...

Female Male
34%
42%

A fostered environment of friendships in the workplace

33%
44%

Opportunity to work on innovative projects during work hours

19%
16%

Childcare support

55%
44%

Paid time off

66%
62%

Flexible work arrangements

Even with large companies adding family leave policies to their benefits, many parents feel there is a stigma of taking advantage of these programs, and fear losing visibility and career momentum – including Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, who promises to work throughout her ‘maternity leave’ when her twins are born in early 2016.

Millennials are a force to contend with

The presence of a generation used to getting what it wants is already being felt. More than one in three US workers are Millennials, surpassing Gen Xers as the largest generational group in the workforce, according to Pew Research Center. One in four are in management roles already. The Kelly study reveals what Work–Life Design elements most appeal to young workers.

What Millennials value (apart from salary and other monetary considerations)

0%

Paid time off, like vacations

0%

Flexible work arrangements

0%

Wellness programs

0%

Childcare support

0%

Caregiver support

45% of employers claim that millennials have the highest turnover rates in their company. The majority of all turnover (not specified to millenials) - 52%, occurs in the first year of employment.

Source: www.celayix.com/12-employee-retention-facts-will-keep-night

Regions Tell Their Own Stories

Willingness to give up career advancement or higher pay for ...

Career enhancement Higher pay
APAC
29%
24%
EMEA
18%
11%
Americas
20%
14%

Less management responsibilities/decreased scope in job responsibilities

APAC
29%
35%
EMEA
20%
25%
Americas
22%
21%

Reduced work schedule (Reduced hours)

APAC
31%
35%
EMEA
25%
28%
Americas
26%
30%

Opportunity to work remotely

APAC
36%
48%
EMEA
28%
32%
Americas
29%
36%

More flexible work arrangements